Saturday, March 29, 2014

Interactive Visualization: Explore the 2014 "Sunshine List"

The "Sunshine List", a list of Ontario's public service who make more than $100,000 a year, was brought in under the Harris government in 1996, in an effort to increase transparency about just how much the top paid public servants were earning.

Now the list is released each year by the Ontario Ministry of Finance.

However, there has been some frustration that the data are not in the most easily accessible format (HTML & PDF? Really guys?).

Stuart A. Thompson was kind enough to provide the data in an easier to digest format (Nick Ragaz also provided it in CSV), as well as producing a tool for exploring it on The Globe and Mail.

I thought it'd be great to get a more visual exploration of the data at fine granularity, so have produced this interactive visualization below.

You can filter the data by searching by employer, name, or position. You can also filter the list by selecting points or groups of points on the scatterplot on the left, and highlight groups of points (or individual employees) by selecting components in the bar graph at the right. The bar graph on the right can also be expanded and collapsed to view the aggregate salary and benefits by employer, or to view the quantities for individual employees.

Hovering over data points on either graph will display the related data in a tooltip - I've found this is handy for looking at individual points of interest on the scatterplot. Zoom and explore to find interesting patterns and individuals. Give it a try!



I've plotted benefit against salary with the latter having a logarithmic axis so that the data are easier visualized and explored (note that I am in no way suggesting that benefits are a function of salary).

Using combinations of all these possible interactions mentioned above you can do some interesting visual analysis: for instance, how do the top salaries and benefits earned by Constables across police departments in Ontario differ (seriously, take a look)? What are the relative pay and benefit levels of professors at Ontario Universities on the list? How much does Rob Ford make?

Something interesting I've already noticed is that for many employers there are long horizontal bands where employees' salaries vary but they are fixed into the same benefit buckets. Others have a different relationship, for example, the benefit / salary ratios of those at my alma mater vs those of employees of the City of Toronto:


Hope this tool will be interesting and useful for those interested in the list. As always feedback is welcome in the comments.

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