Saturday, February 9, 2013

Top 10 Super Bowl XLVII Commercials in Social TV (Respin)

So the Super Bowl is kind of a big deal.

Not just because there's a lot of football. And not just because it's a great excuse to get together with friends and drink a whole lot of beer and eat unhealthy foods. And not because it's a good excuse to shout at your new 72" flatscreen with home theater surround that you bought at Best Buy just for your Super Bowl party and are going to try to return the next day even though you're pretty sure now that they don't let you do that any more.

The Super Bowl is a big deal for marketers. For creatives. For 'social media gurus'. Because there's a lot of eyeballs watching those commercials. In fact, I'm pretty sure there's people going to Super Bowl parties who don't even like football and are just there for the commercials, that is if they've not decided to catch all the best ones after the fact on YouTube.

And also, you know, because if you're putting down $6 million for a minute of commercial airtime, you want to make sure that those dollars are well spent.

So Bluefin Labs is generating a lot of buzz lately as they were acquired by Twitter. TV is big, social media is big, so Social TV analytics must be even bigger, right? Right?

Anyhow Bluefin showed up recently in my Twitter feed for a different reason: their report on the Top 10 Super Bowl XLVII commercials in Social TV that they did for AdAge.

The report's pretty and all, but a little too pretty for my liking, so I thought I'd respin some of it.

Breakdown by Gender:

Superbowl XLVII Commercial Social Mentions by Gender

You can see that the male / female split is fairly even overall, with the exception of the NFL Network's ad and to a lesser extent the ad for Fast & Furious 6 which were more heavily mentioned proportionally by males. The Budweiser, Calvin Klein and Taco Bell spots had greater percentages of women commenting.

Sentiment

The Taco Bell, Dodge and Budweiser ads had the most mentions with positive sentiment. The NFL ad had a very large amount of neutral comments (74%), moreso than any other ad, proportionally. The Go Daddy ad had the most negative mentions, for good reason - it's gross and just kind of weird. It wouldn't be the Super Bowl if Go Daddy didn't air a commercial of questionable taste though, right?

Superbowl XLVII Commercial Sentiment Breakdown by Gender
Superbowl XLVII Commercial Sentiment Breakdown by Gender (Proportional)

Lastly, I am going to go against the grain here and say that the next big thing in football is most definitely going to be Leon Sandcastle.

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